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Top 10 Most Common Resume Typos

We took a sample of over 10,000 resumes and discovered that 7.5% of them were flagged for a “common language” typo. This means that there was a clearly misspelled word somewhere within the resume (as opposed to incorrect word usage which we’ll probably look at later). These typos were clearly the fault of the resume writer. The 7.5% with typos averaged 1.3 typos per resume.

Should candidates be eliminated because of a résumé typo?

Before I share my opinion on the matter, I thought I would first lay the groundwork for how frequent typos are and which ones are the most prevalent. We took a sample of over 10,000 resumes and discovered that 7.5% of them were flagged for a “common language” typo. This means that there was a clearly misspelled word somewhere within the resume (as opposed to incorrect word usage which we’ll probably look at later). These typos were clearly the fault of the resume writer. The 7.5% with typos averaged 1.3 typos per resume.

Top Ten Most Common Typos:

  1. thru → through
  2. managment → management
  3. planed → planned
  4. liason → liaison
  5. ect → etc
  6. excell → excel
  7. assitant → assistant
  8. enviroment → environment
  9. univeristy → university
  10. activites → activities

(full list below)

As for my opinion on the subject…

I think resume typos should not be the sole factor that eliminates a candidate. It should perhaps put a “proceed with caution” on the applicant, but all candidate leads should be vetted beyond a single factor. Some managers are extremely hypersensitive to spelling and grammar on resumes and I understand that. They’re formal documents and should be meticulously crafted. However, in my experience, grammar and spelling do not have a direct correlation to employee production or intelligence. Typos for me would be near the bottom of my list of candidate consideration factors. They might serve as a tiebreaker between two seemingly equal candidates but nothing more. Relevancy, intent, and validity of the resume are the most important qualities I look for.

(And regarding the word “resume”, taking the time to include all the necessary acute accents over the e’s would have apparently taken me too long.)

The full list of most common resume typos

  1. thru → through
  2. management → management
  3. planed → planned
  4. liason → liaison
  5. ect → etc
  6. excell → excel
  7. assitant → assistant
  8. enviroment → environment
  9. univeristy → university
  10. activites → activities
  11. recieved → received
  12. adminstration → administration
  13. alot → a lot|allot
  14. aircrafts → aircraft
  15. recieving → receiving
  16. maintance → maintenance
  17. assit → assist
  18. adminstrative → administrative
  19. liasion → liaison
  20. consistantly → consistently
  21. commerical → commercial
  22. developement → development
  23. achievments → achievements
  24. superintendant → superintendent
  25. buisness → business
  26. responsiblities → responsibilities
  27. residental → residential
  28. sevice → service
  29. proffesional → professional
  30. holliday → holiday
  31. intial → initial
  32. busines → business
  33. mortage → mortgage
  34. universtiy → university
  35. relevent → relevant
  36. responsibilites → responsibilities
  37. thier → their
  38. vermillion → vermilion
  39. personel → personnel
  40. definately → definitely
  41. acheived → achieved
  42. sargeant → sergeant
  43. goverment → government
  44. resturants → restaurants
  45. labled → labelled
  46. safty → safety
  47. wich → which
  48. assocation → association
  49. acheivement → achievement
  50. todays → today’s


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